Bereavement leave is soon to be extended and made more flexible
09/07/2021

On 17 June 2021, a bill was passed in Parliament to extend and ease bereavement leave in the event of the death of a partner or a child. The aim of this law is, in a medical sense, to allow sufficient time for a natural and normal grieving process.


Extension of bereavement leave in the case of the death of a spouse/cohabiting partner / child 
 
From the entry into force of the law (still unknown at the time of publishing this newsflash), bereavement leave will be extended from 3 days to 10 days in the case of the death of one of the following persons:
  • spouse of the employee;
  • cohabiting partner of the employee;
  • child of the employee;
  • child of the spouse or cohabitant partner;
  • foster child in the context of long-term foster care.
This leave will also be more flexible. Currently, the three days must be taken in the period starting on the day of the decease and ending on the day of the funeral. In future, the three days will have to be taken between the day of the decease and the day of the funeral, and the remaining seven days in the year following the day of the decease. However, at the request of the employee and with the consent of the employer, it will be possible to depart from these two rules.
 

Extension of bereavement leave in the case of the death of a first degree relative
 
Bereavement leave is extended to 2 days in case of death of one of the following persons living with the employee:
  • sister or brother of the employee;
  • brother-in-law or sister-in-law of the employee;
  • grandparent of the employee;
  • grandchild of the employee;
  • great-grandparent of the employee;
  • great-grandchild of the employee;
  • son-in-law, daughter-in-law or cohabiting partner of the employee.
These days must be taken between the day of the decease and the day of the funeral.
 
If the deceased did not live with the employee, the bereavement leave remains at 1 day, to be taken on the day of the funeral.
 
In both cases, as for the timing of the leave days, parties can agree otherwise at the employee's request.
 

New leave
 
In future, the right to bereavement leave will be extended to 3 days in the event of the death of one of the following persons:
  • parent of the spouse/cohabiting partner;
  • parent-in-law or step-parent of the employee/spouse/cohabiting partner;
  • foster parent of the employee in the context of long-term foster care at the time of death.
In these cases, the leave must be taken between the day of the decease and the day of the funeral, unless parties agree otherwise at the employee's request.

Finally, the employee is also entitled to bereavement leave in the case of the death of a foster child living with the employee or the employee's spouse or cohabiting partner in the context of short-term foster care at the time of decease, for 1 day, to be taken on the day of the funeral, unless otherwise agreed with the employer at the employee's request.


Action point
 
The situations in which employees are entitled to bereavement leave will soon be increased and the length of the leave will in some cases be extended. The time at which bereavement leave can be taken will also become more flexible. We will let you know when these changes come into effect.

Related : Claeys & Engels


All articles Labour law

Lastest articles Labour law

EU Court of Justice says headscarf ban is not discriminatory
21/07/2021

Following the STIB judgement of 3 May 2021 by the Labour Court of Brussels, ordering the STIB to end its policy of neutral...

Read more

Succession of fixed-term employment contracts and replacement contracts: the Constitutional Court...
20/07/2021

On 17 June 2021, the Constitutional Court issued an important decision in which it ruled that the fact that there are no s...

Succession of fixed-term employment contracts and replacement contracts: the Constitutional Court rules on the issue Read more

ECtHR rules on social media-linked dismissal in Melike v. Turkey
17/07/2021

The European Court of Human Right’s ruling of 15 June 2021 concerned the dismissal of a contractual cleaning lady in...

ECtHR rules on social media-linked dismissal in Melike v. Turkey Read more

Returning to the workplace, Part 2 - when working from home comes at a price
16/07/2021

At the risk of kicking in an open door, working from home and the return to the office has become this summer’s...

Read more

LexGO Network